Title I Information

Title 1 Consolidated Needs Assessment/ SIP


Consolidated Needs Assessment graphic

School Improvement Plan graphic

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School Improvement Plan


Parent Involvement Policy

Click to view the Family Engagement Policy Page.

Click to review the School-Parent Compact information.

What is Title I?

Dalton High School is identified as a Title I school as part of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Title I is designed to support state and local school reform efforts tied to the challenging state academic standards to improve teaching and learning for students. Title I programs must be based on effective means of improving student achievement and include strategies to support family engagement. All Title 1 Schools must jointly develop with parents and family members a written parent and family engagement policy.

Comprehensive Needs Assessment


Team Members


1.1 Identification of Team
The comprehensive needs assessment team consists of people who are responsible for working collaboratively throughout the needs assessment process. Ideal team members possess knowledge of programs, the capacity to plan and implement the needs assessment, and the ability to ensure stakeholder involvement. A required team member’s name may be duplicated when
multiple roles are performed by the same person. Documentation of team member involvement must be maintained by the LEA. Watch the Planning and Preparation webinar for additional information and guidance.

Bartoo, Steve Principal

Hungerpiller, Stephanie Assistant Principal, Title I Coordinator

McKinney, Missie, Assistant Principal

Ashlock, Jessica, Assistant Principal

McKinney, Jeff, Assistant Principal

Smith, Leigh Anne, Instructional Technology Coach

Swope, Jennifer, Instructional Coach

Peters, Ivelisse, Social Worker

Mora, Alex, Transition Coach


Planning and Preparation


1.2 Identification of Stakeholders

Stakeholders are those individuals with valuable experiences and perspective who will provide the team with important input, feedback, and guidance. Required stakeholders must be engaged in the process to meet the requirements of participating federal programs. Documentation of stakeholder involvement must be maintained by the LEA. Watch the Planning and Preparation webinar for additional information and guidance.

Stakeholders

Stakeholder # 1 Science Teacher/Department Chair Tony Carlson
Stakeholder # 2 Family Engagement Coordinator Kelly Spinetta
Stakeholder # 3 Counselor Julie Gallman
Stakeholder # 4 SS Teacher/Department Chair Barbara Brayford
Stakeholder # 5 EL Teacher/Department Chair Virginia Luna
Stakeholder # 6 ELA Teacher/Department Chair Jim Wickes
Stakeholder # 7 ESS Teacher/Department Chair Amy Mayfield
Stakeholder # 8 Math Teacher/Department Chair Amanda Hawkins

1.2 Identification of Stakeholders
How will the team ensure that stakeholders are able to provide meaningful feedback throughout the needs assessment process?

The completed plan will be available for review internally and publicly for
feedback from all interested stakeholders. The plan will be disseminated for
review electronically and hard copies will also be available.


Data Collection Analysis


2.1 Coherent Instructional System

Analyze the LEA’s data (including sections 2.6) and answer the guiding questions to determine existing trends and patterns that support the identification of instructional needs. Complete a data-informed self-rating for each Georgia School Performance Standard (GSPS). See the Coherent Instructional System webinar for additional information and guidance.


Curriculum Standards


Curriculum Standard 1 - Uses systematic, collaborative planning processes so that teachers share an understanding of expectations for standards, curriculum, assessment, and instruction.

1. Exemplary A systematic, collaborative process is used proactively for curriculum planning.
Nearly all teachers or groups of teachers, support staff, and leaders within the school
have common expectations for standards, curriculum, assessment, and instruction.

2. Operational A systematic, collaborative process is used regularly for curriculum planning.
Most teachers or groups of teachers within the school have common expectations for
standards, curriculum, assessment, and instruction.

3. Emerging A collaborative process is used occasionally for curriculum planning.Some teachers or groups of teachers within the school have common expectations for standards, curriculum, assessment, and instruction. 4. Not Evident A collaborative process is rarely, if ever, used for curriculum planning. Few, if any, teachers or groups of teachers within the school have common expectations for standards, curriculum, assessment, and instruction.

Curriculum Standard 2 - Designs curriculum documents and aligns resources with the intended rigor of the required standards

1. Exemplary Curriculum documents (e.g., lesson plans, unit plans, performance tasks, curriculum maps, scope, and sequence documents, guides) that are aligned with the intended rigor of the required standards are the products of a systematic, collaborative process. These curriculum documents and resources are used and continuously revised by teachers and support staff to ensure an alignment with the intended, taught, and tested standards.
2. Operational Curriculum documents (e.g., lesson plans, unit plans, performance tasks, curriculum maps, scope and sequence documents, guides) have been designed, and resources are aligned with the intended rigor of the required standards. These curriculum documents and resources guide the work of teachers and instructional support staff.
3. Emerging Curriculum documents and resources exist, but they are not complete in all content areas or grade levels or lack the intended rigor of the required standards
4. Not Evident Few, if any, curriculum documents and resources exist to support the implementation of the intended rigor of the required standards.


Instruction Standards


Instruction Standard 1 - Provides a supportive and well-managed environment conducive to learning

1. Exemplary A supportive and well-managed environment conducive to learning is evident
throughout the school. Students consistently stay on-task and take responsibility for their own actions.
2. Operational A supportive and well-managed environment conducive to learning is evident in most classrooms.
3. Emerging A supportive and well-managed environment conducive to learning is evident in some classrooms.
4. Not Evident A supportive and well-managed environment conducive to learning is evident in few, if any, classrooms.


Instruction Standard 2 - Creates an academically challenging learning environment

1. Exemplary Nearly all teachers create an academically challenging, learning environment (e.g., higher-order thinking skills and processes, active student engagement, relevance, collaboration). Students consistently work independently and in teams to solve real-world problems that require advanced effort, decision-making, and critical and creative thinking.
2. Operational Most teachers create an academically challenging, learning environment (e.g., higher-order thinking skills and processes, active student engagement, relevance, collaboration).
3. Emerging Some teachers create an academically challenging learning environment.
4. Not Evident Few, if any, teachers create an academically challenging learning environment.


Instruction Standard 3 - Establishes and communicates clear learning targets and success criteria aligned to curriculum standards

1. Exemplary Nearly all teachers establish and communicate clear learning targets and success criteria aligned to the required curriculum standards. Learning targets are evident throughout the lesson and in student work. Articulation of the learning targets is consistent and pervasive among like content areas and grade levels
2. Operational Most teachers establish and communicate clear learning targets and success criteria aligned to the required curriculum standards. Learning targets are evident throughout the lesson and in student work.
3. Emerging Some teachers establish and communicate clear learning targets and success criteria aligned to the required curriculum standards.
4. Not Evident Few, if any teachers establish clear learning targets and success criteria aligned to the required curriculum standards.


Instruction Standard 4 - Uses research based instructional practices that positively impact student learning

1. Exemplary Nearly all teachers pervasively demonstrate a repertoire of highly effective, research-based instructional practices that positively impact student learning (e.g., providing feedback, cooperative learning, advance organizers, questioning techniques, similarities and differences, reinforcing effort, goal setting, summarizers, graphic representations, reciprocal teaching).
2. Operational Most teachers demonstrate a repertoire of effective, research-based instructional practices that positively impact student learning (e.g., providing feedback, cooperative learning, advance organizers, questioning techniques, similarities and differences, reinforcing effort, goal setting, summarizers, graphic representations, reciprocal teaching).
3. Emerging Some teachers demonstrate a repertoire of effective, research-based instructional practices that positively impact student learning.
4. Not Evident Few, if any, teachers demonstrate a repertoire of effective, research-based instructional practices that positively impact student learning.

Instruction Standard 5 - Differentiates instruction to meet specific learning needs of students

1. Exemplary Nearly all teachers differentiate instruction (e.g., using flexible grouping, making adjustments, providing choices based upon readiness levels, interests, or needs) to meet the specific learning needs of students. Nearly all teachers plan and implement multiple means of representation, engagement, action, and expression to meet the learning needs of students (UDL). Remediation, enrichment, and acceleration are pervasive practices.
2. Operational Most teachers differentiate instruction (e.g., using flexible grouping, making adjustments, providing choices based upon readiness levels, interests, or needs) to meet the specific learning needs of students. Most teachers plan and implement multiple means of representation, engagement, action, and expression to meet the learning needs of students (UDL).
3. Emerging Some teachers differentiate instruction to meet the specific learning needs of students.
4. Not Evident Few, if any, teachers differentiate instruction to meet the specific learning needs of students.

Instruction Standard 6 - Uses appropriate, current technology to enhance learning

1. Exemplary The use by staff members and students of appropriate, current technology to enhance learning is an institutional practice (e.g., facilitate communication, collaboration, research, design, creativity, problem-solving).
2. Operational Most staff members and students use appropriate, current technology to enhance learning (e.g., facilitate communication, collaboration, research, design, creativity, problem-solving).
3. Not Evident Some staff members, students, or both use appropriate, current technology to enhance learning.
4. Not Evident Few, if any, teachers demonstrate a repertoire of effective, research-based instructional practices that positively impact student learning.


Instruction Standard 7 - Provides feedback to students on their performance on the standards or learning targets

1. Exemplary- Nearly all teachers use the language of the standards or learning targets to provide students with specific, timely, descriptive feedback on their performance. Nearly all teachers systematically elicit diagnostic information from individual students regarding their understanding of the standards or learning targets.
2. Operational- Most teachers use the language of the standards or learning targets to provide students with specific, timely, descriptive feedback on their performance.
3. Emerging- Some teachers use the language of the standards or learning targets to provide students with specific, descriptive feedback on their performance.
4. Not Evident- Few, if any, teachers use the language of the standards or learning targets to provide students with feedback on their performance, or the feedback that is provided is not specific, timely, or understandable.


Instruction Standard 8 - Establishes a learning environment that empowers students to actively monitor their own progress

1. Exemplary Nearly all students use tools (e.g., rubrics, checklists, exemplars) to actively monitor their own progress. Nearly all students develop a sense of personal responsibility and accountability by engaging in record keeping, self-monitoring, sharing, exhibiting, and self-reflection.
2. Operational Most students use tools (e.g., rubrics, checklists, exemplars) to actively monitor their own progress.
3. Emerging Some students use tools to actively monitor their own progress.
4. Not Evident Few, if any, students use tools to actively monitor their own progress.


Instruction Standard 9 - Provides timely, systematic, data - /driven interventions

1. Exemplary Nearly all students are provided timely, systematic, data-driven interventions to support their learning needs. Interventions are designed to meet the needs of each student. The effectiveness of those interventions is consistently monitored and adjustments are made.
2. Operational Most students are provided timely, systematic, data-driven interventions to support their learning needs.
3. Emerging Some students are provided extra assistance or needed support in a timely manner.
4. Not Evident Few, if any, students are provided extra assistance or effective support in a timely manner.


Assessment Standards


Assessment Standard 1 - Aligns assessments with the required curriculum standards

1. Exemplary Nearly all assessments are aligned with the required curriculum standards. Assessments are reviewed during the school year to ensure alignment.
2. Operational Most assessments are aligned with the required curriculum standards.
3. Emerging Some assessments are aligned with the required curriculum standards.
4. Not Evident Few, if any, assessments are aligned with the required curriculum standards.


Assessment Standard 3 - Uses common assessments aligned with the required standards to monitor student progress, inform instruction, and improve teacher practices.

1. Exemplary Teachers consistently use common assessments aligned with the required standards in nearly all content areas, grade levels, or both for diagnostic, summative, and formative purposes. The data from the common assessments are analyzed down to the item level, and the results are used to inform instruction and improve teacher practices.
2. Operational Teachers use common assessments aligned with the required standards in most content areas to monitor student progress, inform instruction, and improve teacher practices.
3. Emerging Teachers use some common assessments aligned with the required standards in a few content areas with a limited amount of data analysis to monitor student progress, inform instruction, or improve teacher practices.
4. Not Evident Teachers use few, if any, common assessments to monitor student progress, inform instruction, or improve teacher practices.

Assessment Standard 4 - Implements a process to collaboratively analyze assessment results to adjust instruction

1. Exemplary Teachers extensively use a systematic, collaborative process to analyze assessment results. Instruction is consistently adjusted based on the analysis of assessment results across all content areas, grade levels, or both.
2. Operational Teachers regularly use a collaborative process to analyze assessment results. Instruction is routinely adjusted based on the analysis of assessment results.
3. Emerging Teachers occasionally use a collaborative process to analyze assessment results. Instruction is sometimes adjusted based on the analysis of assessment results.
4. Not Evident A collaborative process to analyze assessment results does not exist. Instruction is rarely, if ever, adjusted based on the analysis of assessment results.


Assessment Standard 5 - Implements grading practices that provide an accurate indication of student progress on the required standards

1. Exemplary The grading practices used by teachers across nearly all content areas, grade levels, or both, consistently provide an accurate indication of student progress on the required standards.
2. Operational The grading practices used by teachers in most content areas, grade levels, or both provide an accurate indication of student progress on the required standards.
3. Emerging The grading practices used by teachers in some content areas, grade levels, or both provide an accurate indication of student progress on the required standards.
4. Not Evident The grading practices used by teachers rarely, if ever, provide an accurate indication of student progress on the required standards.

2.2 Effective Leadership


Analyze the LEA’s data (including sections 2.6) and answer the guiding questions to determine existing trends and patterns that support the identification of leadership needs. Complete a data-informed self-rating for each Georgia School Performance Standard (GSPS). See the Effective Leadership webinar for additional information and guidance.




Leadership Standards


Leadership Standard 1 - Builds and sustains relationships to foster the success of students and staff

1. Exemplary Administrators consistently build and sustain relationships to foster the success of students and staff. The school staff is fully engaged in relationship building through collaboration, internal and external communication, and building trust with staff, students, families, and community stakeholders.
2. Operational Administrators regularly build and sustain relationships to foster the success of students and staff.
3. Emerging Administrators sometimes build relationships to foster the success of students and staff.
4. Not Evident Administrators seldom, if ever, build relationships to foster the success of students and staff.


Leadership Standard 2 - Initiates and manages change to improve staff performance and student learning

1. Exemplary Administrators, the school leadership team, and other teacher leaders initiate and sustain change to improve staff performance and student learning. Administrators, the school leadership team, and other teacher leaders create a sense of urgency for change and effectively communicate a common vision.
2. Operational Administrators and the school leadership team initiate and sustain change to improve staff performance and student learning. The principal provides an appropriate balance of pressure and support to manage the
change process for desired results.
3. Emerging Administrators initiate change to improve staff performance and student learning but do not sustain the change, remove barriers, or both.
4. Not Evident Administrators initiate few, if any, changes that impact staff performance and student learning.


Leadership Standard 3 - Uses systems to ensure effective implementation of curriculum, assessment, instruction, and professional learning practices

1. Exemplary The principal and other school leaders continually use systems to ensure effective implementation of curriculum, assessment, instruction, and professional learning practices. The principal and other school leaders have a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the best practices for curriculum, assessment, instruction, and professional learning.
2. Operational The principal and other school leaders often use systems to ensure effective implementation of curriculum, assessment, instruction, and professional learning practices.
3. Emerging The principal and other school leaders occasionally use systems to ensure effective implementation of curriculum, assessment, instruction, and professional learning practices.
4. Not Evident The principal and other school leaders rarely, if ever, use systems to ensure effective implementation of curriculum, assessment, instruction, and professional learning practices.


Leadership Standard 4 - Uses processes to systematically analyze data to improve student achievement

1. Exemplary Extensive, comprehensive processes, including root cause analysis, are used consistently to analyze data (e.g., multiple sources of data: classroom, grade level, departmental, and subgroup, perception data) to improve student achievement.
2. Operational Numerous processes are used frequently to analyze data (e.g., multiple sources of data: classroom, grade level, departmental, and subgroup, perception data) to improve student achievement.
3. Emerging Some processes are in place and used occasionally to analyze data to improve student achievement.
4. Not Evident Few, if any, processes are in place to analyze data to improve student achievement.


Leadership Standard 5 - Builds leadership capacity through shared decision-making and problem-solving

1. Exemplary Extensive structures exist for staff to engage in shared decision-making and problem-solving and to build their leadership capacities. Administrators collaborate consistently with staff members to gather input.
2. Operational Numerous structures exist for staff to engage in shared decision-making and problem-solving and to build their leadership capacities.
3. Emerging Some structures exist for staff to engage in shared decision-making, problem-solving, or both.
4. Not Evident Few, if any, structures exist for staff to engage in shared decision-making or problem-solving.

Leadership Standard 6 - Establishes and supports a data-driven school leadership team that is focused on student learning

1. Exemplary A highly effective, proactive, and data-driven school leadership team is focused on student learning. The leadership team addresses nearly all areas of student and staff learning and school leadership, including the development, implementation, and regular monitoring of the school improvement plan.
2. Operational A data-driven school leadership team is established with stakeholder representation (e.g., core and non-core teachers, certified support staff) and is focused on student learning. The school leadership team meets regularly and uses norms and protocols to work effectively and efficiently.
3. Emerging The school leadership team is established and has some stakeholder representation but is focused chiefly on school operations rather than student learning.
4. Not Evident A school leadership team does not exist or does not have adequate stakeholder representation.


Leadership Standard 7
- Monitors and evaluates the performance of teachers and other staff using multiple data sources

1. Exemplary Monitoring the performance of teachers and other staff through observations, surveys, data, and documentation is consistent and comprehensive, resulting in highly accurate performance evaluations. A comprehensive system is in place to provide teachers and staff with ongoing, accurate, timely, detailed, descriptive feedback related to their performance. Administrators use the evaluation process to identify role models, teacher leaders, or both.
2. Operational Monitoring the performance of teachers and other staff regularly occurs using data or documentation, generally resulting in accurate performance evaluations. Teachers and staff receive accurate, timely, descriptive feedback related to their performance.
3. Emerging Monitoring the performance of teachers and other staff is inconsistent, incomplete, or lacks data or documentation, sometimes resulting in inaccurate performance evaluations. Teachers and staff receive some descriptive feedback related to their performance.
4. Not Evident Monitoring the performance of teachers and other staff rarely occurs or often results in inaccurate performance evaluations. Teachers and staff receive little or no descriptive feedback related to their performance.


Leadership Standard 8 - Provides ongoing support to teachers and other staff

1. Exemplary A comprehensive support system that is timely and targeted to individual needs is provided to teachers and other staff.
2. Operational Most support provided to teachers and other staff is targeted to individual needs.
3. Emerging Some support provided to teachers and staff is targeted to individual needs.
4. Not Evident Support to teachers and staff does not exist or is not targeted to individual needs.


Planning and Organization Standards


Planning and Organization Standard 1 - Shares a common vision and mission that define the school culture and guide the continuous improvement process

1. Exemplary: A common vision and mission have been collaboratively developed and communicated to nearly all stakeholders. The culture of the school has been deeply defined over time by the vision and mission, which are updated as needed. The daily work and practices of staff consistently demonstrate a sustained commitment to continuous improvement.
2. Operational A common vision and mission have been developed through a collaborative process and communicated to most stakeholders. The vision and mission define the culture of the school and guide the continuous improvement process.
3. Emerging A common vision and mission have been developed by some staff members but have not been effectively communicated so that they guide the continuous improvement process.
4. Not Evident A common vision and mission have not been developed or updated or have been developed by a few staff members.

Planning and Organization Standard 2 - Uses a data-driven and consensus-oriented process to develop and implement a school improvement plan that is focused on student performance

1. Exemplary A school improvement plan has been developed using a data-driven and consensus-oriented process with input from nearly all stakeholders. The plan includes appropriate goals and strategies with a strong focus on increasing
student performance. This process and plan consistently guide the work of the school staff.
2. Operational A school improvement plan has been developed using a data-driven and consensus-oriented process with input from most plan stakeholders. The plan includes appropriate goals and strategies with a focus on increasing student
performance.
3. Emerging A school improvement plan has been developed with input from some stakeholders. The school improvement plan is based on incomplete data analysis with limited focus on student performance.
4. Not Evident An up-to-date, data-driven school improvement plan focused on student performance is not in place.


Planning and Organization Standard 3 - Monitors implementation of the school improvement plan and makes adjustments as needed

1. Exemplary The goals and strategies of the school improvement plan are continually monitored by administrators, the school leadership team, and teacher leaders to evaluate the impact on student performance. Ongoing adjustments are made based on various performance, process, and perception data.
2. Operational he goals and strategies of the school improvement plan are regularly monitored by administrators and the school leadership team to evaluate the impact on student performance.
Adjustments are made to the plan, as needed, based on the analysis of data.
3. Emerging The goals and strategies of the school improvement plan are occasionally monitored by administrators.
4. Not Evident The goals and strategies of the school improvement plan are rarely, if ever, monitored.


Planning and Organization Standard 4 - Monitors the use of available resources to support continuous improvement

1. Exemplary: The use of available resources (e.g., personnel, time, facilities, equipment, materials) to
support continuous improvement is consistently monitored. School schedules and processes are designed to make effective use of personnel, time, materials, and equipment.
2. Operational: The use of available resources (e.g., personnel, time, facilities, equipment, materials) to support continuous improvement is frequently monitored.
3. Emerging: The use of available resources to support continuous improvement is inconsistently
monitored.
4. Not Evident: The use of available resources to support continuous improvement is rarely, if ever,
monitored.


Planning and Organization Standard 5 - Develops, communicates, and implements rules, policies, schedules, and procedures to maximize student learning and staff effectiveness

1. Exemplary Rules, policies, schedules, and procedures are developed with stakeholder input, effectively communicated, and consistently implemented throughout the school to maximize student learning and staff effectiveness. These rules, policies, schedules, and procedures are consistently reviewed and revised as needed.
2. Operational Rules, policies, schedules, and procedures are developed, communicated, and implemented throughout the school to maximize student learning and staff effectiveness.
These rules, policies, schedules, and procedures are periodically reviewed and systematically revised as needed.
3. Emerging Rules, policies, schedules, and procedures are developed but are not effectively communicated or are implemented inconsistently across the school.
4. Not Evident Rules, policies, or procedures are not developed, are poorly communicated, or are ineffectively implemented. In some cases, rules, policies, schedules, or procedures are out of date or have become barriers to student learning or staff effectiveness.



2.3 Professional Capacity


Analyze the LEA’s data (including sections 2.6) and answer the guiding questions to determine existing trends and patterns that support the identification of professional capacity needs. Complete a data-informed self-rating for each Georgia School Performance Standard (GSPS). See the Professional Capacity webinar for additional information and guidance.


Professional Learning Standards


Professional Learning Standard 1 - Aligns professional learning with needs identified through analysis of a variety of data

1. Exemplary Professional learning needs are identified and differentiated through a collaborative analysis process using a variety of data (e.g., student achievement data, examination of student work, process data, teacher and leader effectiveness data, action research data, perception data from students, staff, and families). Ongoing support is provided through differentiated professional learning.
2. Operational Professional learning needs are identified through a collaborative analysis process using a variety of data (e.g., student achievement data, examination of student work, process data, teacher and leader effectiveness data, action research data, perception data from students, staff, and families).
3. Emerging Professional learning needs are identified using limited sources of data.
4. Not Evident Professional learning needs are identified using little or no data.


Professional Learning Standard 2 - Establishes a culture of collaboration among administrators and staff to enhance individual and collective performance

1. Exemplary Administrators and staff, as a foundational practice, consistently collaborate to support leadership and personal accountability and to enhance individual and collective performance (e.g., construct knowledge, acquire skills, refine practice, provide feedback). Teachers conduct action research and assume ownership of professional learning processes.
2. Operational Administrators and staff routinely collaborate to improve individual and collective performance (e.g., construct knowledge, acquire skills, refine practice, provide feedback).
3. Emerging Administrators and staff sometimes collaborate to improve individual and collective performance.
4. Not Evident Administrators and staff rarely collaborate to improve individual and collective performance.


Professional Learning Standard 3 - Defines expectations for implementing professional learning

1. Exemplary Administrators, teacher leaders, or both consistently define expectations for the implementation of professional learning, including details regarding the stages of implementation and how monitoring will occur as implementation progresses.
2. Operational Administrators, teacher leaders, or both regularly define expectations for the implementation of professional learning.
3. Emerging Administrators, teacher leaders, or both occasionally define expectations for the implementation of professional learning.
4. Not Evident Administrators, teacher leaders, or both rarely, if ever, define expectations for the implementation of professional learning.


Professional Learning Standard 4 - Uses multiple professional learning designs to support the various learning needs of the staff

1. Exemplary Staff members actively participate in job-embedded professional learning that engages collaborative teams in a variety of appropriate learning designs (e.g., collaborative lesson study, analysis of student work, problem solving sessions, curriculum development, coursework, action research, classroom observations, online networks). Professional learning includes extensive follow-up with descriptive feedback and coaching.
2. Operational Staff members actively participate in professional learning, most of which is job-embedded, which includes multiple designs (e.g., collaborative lesson study, analysis of student work, problem-solving sessions, curriculum development, coursework, action research, classroom observations, online networks) to support their various learning needs. Professional learning includes follow-up with feedback and coaching.
3. Emerging Some staff members are engaged in professional learning that makes use of more than one learning design to address their identified needs.
4. Not Evident Staff members receive single, stand-alone professional learning events that are informational and mostly large-group presentation designs.


Professional Learning Standard 5 - Allocates resources and establishes systems to support and sustain effective professional learning

1. Exemplary Extensive resources (e.g., substitute teachers, materials, handouts, tools, stipends, facilitators, technology) and systems (e.g., conducive schedules, adequate collaborative time, model classrooms) are allocated to support and sustain effective professional learning. Opportunities to practice skills, receive follow-up, feedback, and coaching are
provided to support the effectiveness of professional learning.
2. Operational Adequate resources (e.g., substitute teachers, materials, handouts, tools, stipends, facilitators, technology) and systems (e.g., conducive schedules, adequate collaborative time, model classrooms) are in place to support and sustain professional learning.
3. Emerging Some resources and systems are allocated to support and sustain professional learning.
4. Not Evident Few, if any, resources and systems are provided to support and sustain professional learning.





Family and Community Engagement


2.4 Family and Community Engagement

Analyze the LEA’s data (including sections 2.6) and answer the guiding questions to determine existing trends and patterns that support the identification of needs related to family and community engagement. Complete a data-informed self-rating for each Georgia School Performance Standard (GSPS). See the Family and Community Engagement webinar for additional information and guidance. Visit Georgia’s Family Connection Partnership’s KIDS COUNT for additional data.


Family and Community Engagement Standards


Family and Community Engagement Standard 1 - Creates an environment that welcomes, encourages, and connects family and community members to the school

1. Exemplary The school has a well-established, inviting learning environment that welcomes, encourages, and connects family and community members to the school. Numerous opportunities are given to family members to become actively engaged in school-related events and improvement efforts as participants, event managers, and workers.
2. Operational The school has created an environment that welcomes, encourages, and connects family and community members to the school.
3. Emerging The school has made some progress toward creating an environment that welcomes, encourages, and connects family and community members to the school.
4. Not Evident The school has not created an environment that welcomes, encourages, or connects family and community members to the school.


Family and Community Engagement Standard 2 - Establishes structures that promote clear and open communication between the school and stakeholders

1. Exemplary Extensive structures that promote clear and open communication between the school and stakeholders have been effectively established and implemented. Structures are continuously monitored for reliable and interactive communication.
2. Operational Most structures that promote clear and open communication between the school and stakeholders have been effectively established and implemented.
3. Emerging Some structures that promote clear and open communication between the school and stakeholders exist.
4. Not Evident Few, if any, structures that promote clear and open communication between the school and stakeholders exist.


Family and Community Engagement Standard 3 - Establishes relationships and decision-making processes that build capacity for family and community engagement in the success of students

1. Exemplary A wide variety of relationships and collaborative decision-making processes (e.g., business partnerships, school councils, parent or family organizations, academic and extra-curricular booster clubs, civic organizations, tutoring services, post-secondary partnerships) are pervasive in promoting student success and well being. Expectations for family and community engagement are embedded in the culture and result in stakeholders being actively involved in decision-making.
2. Operational Numerous relationships and decision-making processes (e.g., business partnerships, school councils, parent or family organizations, academic and extra-curricular booster clubs, civic organizations, tutoring services) effectively build capacity for family and community engagement in the success of students.✔
3. Emerging Limited relationships and decision-making processes have been initiated by the school to build capacity for family and community engagement.
4. Not Evident Relationships and decision-making processes for families and the community are non-existent, or those that do exist contribute minimally to student success.


Family and Community Engagement Standard 4 - Communicates academic expectations and current student achievement status to families

1. Exemplary The school staff provides families with ongoing, detailed academic expectations and/or graduation status (e.g., four-year graduation plans, syllabi, academic advisement protocols). Extensive communication related to the current achievement level of individual students is provided (e.g., progress reports, student-led parent conferences, report cards, reading level reports, state test reports, school-based assessment reports, online reporting system).
2. Operational The school staff communicates academic expectations and/or graduation status (e.g., four-year graduation plans, syllabi, academic advisement protocols) throughout the year. Regular communication related to the current achievement level of individual students is provided (e.g., progress reports, parent conferences, report cards, reading level reports, state test reports, school-based assessment reports, online reporting system).✔
3. Emerging The school staff communicates some academic expectations at the start of the year. Some communication related to the current achievement level of individual students is provided.
4. Not Evident The school staff does little to inform families of academic expectations. Little, if any, communication related to the current achievement level of individual students is provided.


Family and Community Engagement Standard 5 - Develops the capacity of families to use support strategies at home that will enhance academic achievement

1. Exemplary The school continually develops the capacity (e.g., parent training, lunch and learn, make-it and take-it) of families to use support strategies at home that will enhance academic achievement.
2. Operational The school frequently develops the capacity (e.g., parent training, lunch and learn, make-it and take-it) of families to use support strategies at home that will enhance academic achievement.
3. Emerging The school occasionally develops the capacity of families to use support strategies at home that will enhance academic achievement.
4. Not Evident The school seldom, if ever, develops the capacity of families to use support strategies at home that will enhance academic achievement.


Family and Community Engagement Standard 6 - Connects families with agencies and resources in the community to meet the needs of students

1. Exemplary The school has a systematic process in place to connect families with an array of agencies and resources (e.g., Y-Clubs, after-school programs, health and counseling services, community service agencies, civic organizations, tutoring services) to meet the needs of students.
2. Operational The school regularly connects families to agencies and resources in the community (e.g., Y-Clubs, after-school programs, health and counseling services, community service agencies, civic organizations, tutoring services) to meet the needs of students.✔
3. Emerging The school sometimes connects families to agencies and resources in the community to meet the needs of students.
4. Not Evident The school does little to connect families with agencies and resources in the community to meet the needs of students.




Supportive Learning Environment


2.5 Supportive Learning Environment


Analyze the LEA’s data (including sections 2.6) and answer the guiding questions to determine existing trends and patterns that support the identification of needs related to a supportive learning environment. Complete a data-informed self-rating for each Georgia School Performance Standard (GSPS). Student subgroups with a count of less than 15 are denoted by “TFS” (too few students). See the Supportive Learning Environment webinar for additional information and guidance.


Instruction Standards


Instruction Standard 1 - Provides a supportive and well-managed environment conducive to learning


1. Exemplary A supportive and well-managed environment conducive to learning is evident
throughout the school. Students consistently stay on-task and take responsibility for their own actions.
2. Operational A supportive and well-managed environment conducive to learning is evident in most classrooms.
3. Emerging A supportive and well-managed environment conducive to learning is evident in some classrooms.
4. Not Evident A supportive and well-managed environment conducive to learning is evident in few, if any, classrooms.


Instruction Standard 2 - Creates an academically challenging learning environment


1. Exemplary Nearly all teachers create an academically challenging, learning environment (e.g., higher-order thinking skills and processes, active student engagement, relevance, collaboration). Students consistently work independently and in teams to solve real-world problems that require advanced effort, decision-making, and critical and creative thinking.
2. Operational Most teachers create an academically challenging, learning environment (e.g., higher-order thinking skills and processes, active student engagement, relevance, collaboration).
3. Emerging Some teachers create an academically challenging learning environment.
4. Not Evident Few, if any, teachers create an academically challenging learning environment.


Instruction Standard 8 - Establishes a learning environment that empowers students to actively monitor their own progress


1. Exemplary Nearly all students use tools (e.g., rubrics, checklists, exemplars) to actively monitor their own progress. Nearly all students develop a sense of personal responsibility and accountability by engaging in record keeping, self-monitoring, sharing, exhibiting, and self-reflection.
2. Operational Most students use tools (e.g., rubrics, checklists, exemplars) to actively monitor their own progress.
3. Emerging Some students use tools to actively monitor their own progress.
4. Not Evident Few, if any, students use tools to actively monitor their own progress.


School Culture Standards


School Culture Standard 1 - Develops, communicates, and implements rules, practices, and procedures to maintain a safe, orderly learning environment

1. Exemplary Rules, practices, and procedures that maintain a safe, orderly learning environment are proactively developed, communicated, and consistently implemented across the school. These rules, practices, and procedures are continually monitored and revised as needed.
2. Operational Rules, practices, and procedures that maintain a safe, orderly learning environment are developed, communicated, and implemented.
3. Emerging Rules, practices, and procedures are developed and communicated but are ineffective or inconsistently implemented across the school.
4. Not Evident Rules, practices, and procedures that maintain a safe, orderly, learning environment are not developed nor updated or are poorly communicated.


School Culture Standard 2 - Establishes a culture of trust and respect that promotes positive interactions and a sense of community

1. Exemplary Extensive evidence (e.g., positive and respectful interactions, appreciation of diversity,
tolerance, understanding) exists that a culture of trust and respect has been established. A pervasive commitment to promoting positive interactions and a sense of community is evident.
2. Operational Evidence (e.g., positive and respectful interactions, appreciation of diversity, tolerance, understanding) exists that a culture of trust and respect has been established. A sustained commitment to promoting positive interactions and a sense of community is evident.
3. Emerging Some evidence exists that a culture of trust and respect has been established. A limited commitment to promoting positive interactions and a sense of community is evident.
4. Not Evident Little or no evidence exists that a culture of trust and respect has been established. Unresolved conflicts interfere with a sense of community.

School Culture Standard 3 - Establishes a culture that supports the college and career readiness of students

1. Exemplary Extensive evidence (e.g., advisement, career counseling, transition coaching, high expectations) exists that the beliefs and practices of the school support the college and career readiness of students. The school culture supports addressing individual achievement needs and strengths to prepare students for success.
2. Operational Evidence (e.g., advisement, career counseling, transition coaching, high expectations) exists that the beliefs and practices of the school support the college and career readiness of students.
3. Emerging Some evidence exists that the school supports the college and career readiness of students.
4. Not Evident Little or no evidence exists that the school supports the college and career readiness of students.

School Culture Standard 4 - Supports the personal growth and development of students

1. Exemplary The school staff consistently provides a comprehensive system of support (e.g., counseling, mentoring, advisement, coaching, goal setting, time management, problem solving) to maximize the personal growth and development of nearly all students.
2. Operational The school staff regularly provides support (e.g., counseling, mentoring, advisement, coaching, goal setting, time management, problem solving) to enhance the personal growth and development of students.
3. Emerging The school staff sporadically supports the personal growth and development of students.
4. Not Evident The school staff does little to support the personal growth and development of students.


School Culture Standard 5 - Recognizes and celebrates achievements and accomplishments of students and staff

1. Exemplary The school community consistently recognizes and celebrates the achievements and accomplishments of students and staff. The celebrations are publicized within the school and to the community and support
the culture of the school.
2. Operational The school community regularly recognizes and celebrates the achievements and accomplishments of students and staff.
3. Emerging The school community periodically recognizes or celebrates the achievements or accomplishments of students and/or staff.
4. Not Evident The school community rarely, if ever, recognizes or celebrates the achievements or accomplishments of students or staff.


Planning and Organization Standard


Planning and Organization Standard 1 - Shares a common vision and mission that define the school culture and guide the continuous improvement process

1. Exemplary A common vision and mission have been collaboratively developed and communicated to nearly all stakeholders. The culture of the school has been deeply defined over time by the vision and mission, which are updated as needed. The daily work and practices of staff consistently demonstrate a sustained commitment to continuous improvement.
2. Operational A common vision and mission have been developed through a collaborative process and communicated to most stakeholders. The vision and mission define the culture of the school and guide the continuous
improvement process.
3. Emerging A common vision and mission have been developed by some staff members but have not been effectively communicated so that they guide the continuous improvement process.
4. Not Evident A common vision and mission have not been developed or updated or have been developed by a few staff members.




Data Analysis


2.6 Data Analysis Questions
Analyze the LEA’s data and answer the guiding questions to determine existing trends and patterns that support the identification of demographic and financial needs. Student subgroups with a count of less than 15 are denoted by “TFS” (too few students).

  • What perception data did you use? CCPRI Climate Rating, Gallup poll for students, Superintendent's Focus Group Reflections (parent, student, staff), Stakeholder Surveys (Community, Staff, Parents); Strategic Planning and CNA Community Focus Groups Feedback
Family Engagement Surveys
What does the perception data tell you?
  • Dalton High School has a 5 star climate rating on 2018 CCRPI.
  • District data is as follows: On the most recent Student Gallup poll results, students in grade 5
    - 12 indicated an engagement index of 54%. Additionally, 49% indicated they
    have hope for the future with 51% indicating they are "stuck or discouraged."
    Only 31% agree that they do well in school.
  • The top strengths of the district as
    identified by stakeholders are: level of quality instruction, dual enrollment
    opportunities, policies to recruit and retain highly effective teachers, level of
    focus on student achievement, level of extracurricular activities available to
    students, diversity of population, access to technology, community pride.
    Suggestions for changes to be made: reduce class size, variety in methods to
    assess student achievement, increase level of parental support, continue to
    raise quality of instruction and level of student achievement, raise teacher
    compensation, improve public relations, more summer programs for at-risk
    students.
  • The top challenges of the district are: overcoming the effects of
    poverty on student growth and achievement, developing and nurturing family
    support, enhancing and sustaining robust communications and community
    support, advancing early childhood development, reducing class size, retaining
    quality teachers, improving student mastery of standards and raising the level
    of student achievement, improving professional support infrastructures for
    teachers, consistently engaging student in work with high levels of cognitive
    demand, improving student social and emotional learning competencies,
    addressing the needs of diverse learners and learners new to the country,
    continuing to provide and update state of the art facilities with technology that
    supports and enhances instruction.

  • What process data did you use? Class Rosters, Written Procedures for Identification of gifted and ESS, AP and IB data, CTAE data

  • What does your process data tell you? DHS follows state guidelines for the identification of students for programs designed to address individualized learning needs: All students have access to AP courses; services for EL and ESS; International Baccalaureate program; CTAE programs/pathways.
    Challenges include the effect of poverty, second language, lack of prior schooling, mobility, high EL population, mobility
  • What achievement data did you use? Georgia Milestones End of Course Assessments, AP, IB, Hope eligibility, ACT, SAT, Dual Enrollment, Achievement data over time (SGP), National Clearinghouse data, MAPS data
  • What does your achievement data tell you? SAT and ACT: On the ACT aggregate scores available, Dalton students scored a 21.9 average as compared to the state average of 20.4. On the SAT, Dalton students were below the state average scoring an average score of 1002 compared to the state average of 1033.
    Advanced Placement: Dalton High School had 67 AP scholars in the 2018
    school year with one student being named a National AP Scholar. In 2019,
    Dalton High School has 76 AP Scholars with 4 students being named National AP Scholars.
    International Baccalaureate: Seven students earned the full IB diploma in 2018
    - 2019, the most in the history of the district's program. This translates into a
    70% pass rate for the district. Graduation Rate: Dalton High School's 4-year
    graduation rate for 2018-2019 was 94.03% compared to state rate of 82%.
    DHS's 5 year graduation rate for 2018-19 was 97.04%.
    Thirty-eight percent of students district wide who graduated in 2018 were
    Hope eligible.
  • What demographic data did you use? Student Enrollment, Class Rosters in Infinite Campus, Program Enrollment, Student Mobility Rate
  • What does the demographic data tell you? Dalton High School has high number of EL and poverty students and wide variance in the academic needs of students. Our student body size has continued to grow over the past several years. Class sizes are larger that they have been over the past few years as well. Some of the challenges that we face with our student demographic are: poverty, high EL population ,1st generation immigrant parents , lack of prior schooling, mobility. In summary, there is a
    large number of students who are at great risk of underachieving without strong Tier 1 instruction and effective interventions.

Needs Identification and Root Analysis


3.1 Strengths and Challenges Based on Trends and Patterns
Read the trends and patterns summaries from each section of the data analysis process. Use the information in these summaries to complete 3.2 and 3.3. Using the summaries in 3.1 and other local data, describe the strengths and challenges or answer the guiding questions for each program. Include strengths and challenges related to:

a) general program implementation, and

b)students and adults involved in or affected by the program. Focus on strengths and challenges that will assist in the identification of needs during


Coherent Instructional


Coherent Instructional: Summarize the coherent instructional system trends and patterns observed by the team while completing this section of the report. What are the important trends and patterns that will support the identification of student, teacher, and leader needs?


Reviewing the data confirmed the need to continue and/or revisit some of the
processes that are in place for the 2019-20 school year. The block schedule
provides longer class periods to provide instructional tasks that show deeper
learning in our students which will be continued. The Flexible Learning Time
provides time within the school day for remediation and support for identified
students. To address specific student needs, the students have been assigned to
FLT teams so that a team of teachers consisting on one teacher from each
content area is assigned a group of students who stay with that team
throughout the year. PLC time is provided for a longer period of time to all
teachers to work together with their administrators to develop healthy PLC's
that focus on learning intentions, success criteria, and how to make the best
impact on student learning. Teachers also have morning/lunch collaboration
times to work with teachers in their subject area to plan/design lessons for
their classes. We recognize that we are on the right track with these processes
but still have work to do in the areas of differentiation, depth of knowledge,
and data review from common assessments to improve student achievement.

Effective Leadership: Summarize the effective leadership trends and patterns observed by the team while completing this section of the report. What are the important trends and patterns that will support the identification of student, teacher, and leader needs?


The DHS leaders are engaged in multiple opportunities designed to strengthen
their skills to be effective instructional leaders. These opportunities are offered
both inside the district through the District Administrative Team, Aspiring
Leaders Program and also outside the district through the PAGE network and
the Northwest GA RESA Principal's Center. Leaders also collaborate to work
on administrative and budget processes. DHS leaders participate in
community leadership opportunities such as Leadership Dalton Whitfield and
United Way to build community relationships and foster support of our
school. DPS recently completed the development of a five year Strategic Plan.
There are four main goals: College, Career and Life Readiness, Recruitment
and Retention of Quality Professionals, Operational Excellence, and Family
and Community Engagement. The performance objectives under these goal
areas will provide clarity of areas of need and focus.

Professional Capacity: Summarize the professional capacity trends and patterns observed by the team while completing this section of the report. What are the important trends and patterns that will support the identification of student, teacher, and leader needs?

Learning Forward's Standard for Professional Learning include seven areas:
Learning communities, Resources, Learning Designs, Outcomes, Leadership,
Data, and Implementation. Our district is offering PL that supports the
building of capacity in each of these areas. Through coaching, teachers learn to
reflect on the effectiveness of their teaching. Research reveals that ongoing
teacher training is the critical factor in making a difference in student learning.


Family and Community Engagement


Family and Community Engagement:
Summarize the family and community engagement trends and patterns observed by the team while completing this section of the report.

What are the important trends and patterns that will support the identification of student, teacher, and leader needs?

DHS is a majority minority school with a large population of first generation
immigrant parents who do not speak English and who come from countries
where parent involvement is not expected. It is often difficult for
parents/families to be engaged in school activities. Because of these factors as
well as others, DHS has employed multiple strategies to increase family and
community engagement and continues to do so. The continued use of
dedicated family support personnel such as counselors, family engagement
coordinators, college transition coach, and social workers, the importance
placed on community partnerships, and the use of specially designed supports
and experiences for students and their families all lead to the identification of
student, teacher, and leader needs. We are making an effort to have one face to
face meeting for every DHS student.


Supportive Learning Environment


Supportive Learning Environment:
Summarize the supportive learning environment trends and patterns observed by the team while completing this section of the report. What are the important trends and patterns that will support the identification of student, teacher, and leader needs?

Overwhelmingly, teachers, parents, and students all indicated they feel our
school is safe. The school and district have a number of frameworks in place to
support students and their varying needs. While there are many structures
in place and available to support the district's instructional program and
identify needs, some processes are more mature than others.


Demographic and Financial: Summarize the demographic and financial trends and patterns observed by the team while completing this section of the report. What are the important trends and patterns that will support the identification of student, teacher, and leader needs?

Trends include a strong fund balance, slight slowing of student enrollment,
high number of EL and poverty students as well as a large number of students
who are new to the country over the last few years, wide variance in academic
needs of the students.


Student Achievement


Student Achievement: Summarize the student achievement trends and patterns observed by the team while completing this section of the report. What are the important trends and patterns that will support the identification of student, teacher, and leader needs?

Over the past four years, we have seen an improvement in student
performance in most academic areas, particular resulting from our efforts to
promote rigor, emphasis on pacing and understanding of content standards,
and use of common assessments.

After analyzing Georgia Milestone End of Course data, a few trends are abundantly clear. First, a high percentage of our economically disadvantaged students are performing at the beginner level on EOC's in all academic areas. In fact, in all tested areas, 75% or more of the
students who scored at Level 1 were economically disadvantaged. While there
has been some improvement in the performance of our ESS students on EOC
tests, there is still much work to do. Also, our EL students are struggling on
the EOC due to language deficiencies and lack of understanding of academic
vocabulary. While we have seen improvement in student achievement overall,
there is still work to do for our ED, EL and ESS students.


IDEA


IDEA – Special Education, Economically Disadvantaged Children, and English Learners.
Using the summaries in 3.1 and other local data, describe the strengths and challenges or answer the guiding questions for each program. Include strengths and challenges related to: a) general program implementation, and b) students and adults involved in or affected by the program. Focus on strengths and challenges that will assist in the identification of needs during 3.3. Watch the Identifying Need webinar for additional information and guidance.


Strengths:

The school and district have a number of frameworks in place to support
students and their varying needs. For ESS students, DHS offers resource and
co-teaching classes to support student learning based on individual student
needs. Some ESS students who have significant deficiencies in reading have
the opportunity to participate in an intensive reading program (LLI) to
improve fluency and comprehension during their Flexible Learning Time.
DHS supports our English Learners by providing both sheltered and
co-teaching classes in all academic content areas. Dalton Public Schools also
has a Newcomer's Academy to provide intensive support for our students who
are new to our country and speak little to no English. In regards to our
Economically Disadvantaged students, DHS staff and students are working to
better understand the needs and learning styles of this population of students.
In our content collaboration time, teachers discuss patterns, behaviors, and
learning needs of students. Our ESS teachers also have Case Management Day
once a month to discuss our ESS students, the struggles the students are
having, and work together to design strategies to support the learning of our
ESS students.

Challenges:

Graduation rate is lowest for ESS subgroup followed by EL and African
American students. The pattern is generally replicated on the GA Milestones
assessments. The school's white population tends to perform best on
standardized student achievement measures compared to other demographic
groups in the district. However, there is a gap for the district's white
population when compared to the state when considering GMS testing data.




Root Cause Analysis


3.2 Identification and Prioritization of Overarching Needs
Use the results of 3.1 to identify the overarching needs of the LEA. Determine the priority order of the identified needs based on data, team member and stakeholder knowledge, and answers to questions in the table below. Be sure to address the major program challenges identified in 3.1. Watch the Identifying Need webinar for additional information and guidance.

Overarching Need # 1
Overarching Need Increased student achievement in core content.
How severe is the need? High
Is the need trending better or
worse over time? Better

Can Root Causes be Identified? Yes
Priority Order 1
Additional Considerations


Overarching Need # 2
Overarching Need Increased teacher understanding of content standards. learning intentions, success criteria, and effective Tier 1 strategies.

How severe is the need? High
Is the need trending better or worse over time? Better
Can Root Causes be Identified? Yes
Priority Order 2
Additional Considerations

3.3 Root Cause Analysis
Select the top 2-4 overarching needs from 3.2. Conduct a separate root cause analysis (RCA) for each need. Any RCA tools and resources can be used, but suggestions are available as part of the Identifying Need webinar. After describing the RCA process, complete a table for each selected overarching need.
Overarching Need - Increased student achievement in core content.

Root Cause # 1
Root Causes to be Addressed

Students are not fluent in academic language
All interim and formative assessment items are not representative of higher levels of depth
of knowledge
Instructional strategies used in classrooms do not consistently require critical thinking and
analysis at high depth of knowledge level
Lack of feedback for students in regards to performance on assessments
Students do not understand the learning intentions of the work they are asked to do and
don't have a clear understanding of what is required of them to successfully learn the
content
Students have gaps in learning in previous content


This is a root cause and not a contributing cause or symptom: Yes
This is something we can affect: Yes
Impacted Programs

IDEA - Special Education
School and District Effectiveness
Title I - Part A - Improving Academic Achievement of Disadvantaged
Title III - Language Instruction for English Learners and Immigrant Students
Title IV, Part A - Student Support and Academic Enrichment

Overarching Need - Increased teacher understanding of content standards and learning intentions.
Root Causes to be Addressed

Teachers need more support in establishing healthy PLC's in which they work together on
the content standards, learning intentions, and success criteria so that students clearly
know what they are expected to learn and how successful master of the standards will be
measured.
Pacing guides, assessments, and student work must align to the standards.

This is a root cause and not a contributing cause or symptom: Yes
This is something we can affect: Yes
Impacted Programs

IDEA - Special Education
School and District Effectiveness
Title I - Part A - Improving Academic Achievement of Disadvantaged
Title IV, Part A - Student Support and Academic Enrichment


Additional Responses


School Improvement Plan


Comprehensive Needs Assessment


School Improvement Plan

2019-2020

District: Dalton Public Schools
School Name: Dalton High School
Team Lead: Stephanie Hungerpiller


Federal Funding Options to Be Employed (SWP Schools) in this Plan
✔ Traditional funding (all Federal funds budgeted separately)

Factors(s) Used by District to Identify Students in Poverty (Select all that apply)
✔ Free/Reduced meal application

2.1 Creating Improvement Goals


Effective goals assist districts and schools in attaining collective agreement about what work needs to occur for improvement to take place. Goals should focus and prioritize efforts and resources of the district/school to the previously identified needs and create a focus for improvement. Setting goals should be a strategic process which aligns the goals within one of the five systems:
Coherent Instruction, Effective Leadership, Professional Capacity, Family and Community Engagement, or Supportive Learning Environment.

There are several categories of goals which may be used in school improvement but the one type which focuses on improving results and not just enhancing processes is a SMART goal. SMART is an acronym for:
Specific Measurable Attainable Relevant Time-Bound
An example of a SMART goal is:
By the end of the school year 2017 - 2018, all teachers will heave training and be included in a PLC for their content-specific area.
Enter the school's two to four overarching needs and related root causes, as identified in the Comprehensive Needs Assessment 2017 - 2018 School Report. Use the codes below to list the structures addressed through the goal within each system. For each system, identify one to six action steps that will be taken to address the root causes that have created the overarching need.
Finally, identify any supplemental action steps necessary to ensure the necessary supports are in place for the listed subgroups.
Coherent Instructional
CIS - 1 Planning for quality Instruction
CIS - 2 Delivering Quality Instruction
CIS - 3 Monitoring student progress
CIS - 4 Refining the instructional system
Family and Community Engagement
FCE-1 Welcoming all families and the community
FCE-2 Communicating effectively with all families and the
community
FCE-3 Supporting student access
FCE-4 Empowering families
FCE-5 Sharing leadership with families and the community
FCE-6 Collaborating with the community
Effective Leadership
EL-1 Creating and maintaining a climate and culture conducive
to learning
EL-2 Cultivating and distributing leadership
EL-3 Ensuring high quality instruction in all classroom
EL-4 Managing the School and its resources
EL-5 Driving improvement efforts
Supportive Learning Environment
SLE-1 Maintaining order and safety
SLE-2 Developing and monitoring a system of supports
SLE-3 Ensuring a student learning community
Professional Capacity
PC-1 Attracting staff
PC-2 Developing staff
PC-3 Retaining staff
PC-4 Ensuring staff collaboration


2. SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT GOALS


2.1 Overarching Need # 1

Overarching Need as identified in CNA Section 3.2
Increased student achievement in core content.
Root Cause # 1

Students are not fluent in academic language
All interim and formative assessment items are not representative of higher levels of depth
of knowledge
Instructional strategies used in classrooms do not consistently require critical thinking and
analysis at high depth of knowledge level
Lack of feedback for students in regards to performance on assessments
Students do not understand the learning intentions of the work they are asked to do and
don't have a clear understanding of what is required of them to successfully learn the
content
Students have gaps in learning in previous content

Goal

Increase the total weighted percentage of students performing at levels 2, 3, and 4 on the
GMAS in ELA, Math, Science and Social Studies by six percent in 2020. (Content Mastery
on CCRPI)

COMPLETE INFORMATION ON ACTION STEPS IS AVAILABLE TO DOWNLOAD ON THE PDF DOCUMENT

Action Step # 1

Review curriculum documents to ensure alignment with the cognitive demands of standards


Action Step # 2

Develop and administer common assessments in all content areas

Action Step # 3

Provide ongoing collaboration opportunities for all teachers to study GaDOE curriculum,
instruction, pacing and assessments.

Action Step # 4

Provide feedback to students concerning common assessments


Action Step # 5

Provide targeted instruction in all academic areas for students during the school day


Action Step # 6

Train leaders and teachers in the analysis of assessment data and the use of electronic data warehouses.

Action Step # 7

Conduct professional learning communities with a focus on depth of knowledge, academic
language, learning intentions, success criteria, and Tier 1 instructional strategies.


Action Step # 8

Provide ongoing embedded coaching support for teachers in all academic areas.

Action Step # 9

Continue to build teacher and leader capacity in providing quality and engaging work for
students.


Action Step # 10

Use Family Engagement Coordinator to build capacity for parent involvement in
academic achievement.

Action Step # 11

Provide sessions throughout the year for parents to learn more about ways to support high
school students.

Action Step # 12

Provide bilingual communication to parents and the community.

Action Step # 13

Multi-Tiered Student Support System will in place to monitor student progress and
provide support for students as needed.

Action Step # 14

Identify and implement effective and consistent instructional intervention strategies.


Action Step # 15

Emergency Operations Plan


Overarching Need as identified in CNA Section 3.2

Increased teacher understanding of content standards. learning intentions, success criteria,
and effective Tier 1 strategies.


Root Cause # 1

Teachers need more support in establishing healthy PLC's in which they work together on
the content standards, learning intentions, and success criteria so that students clearly
know what they are expected to learn and how successful master of the standards will be
measured.
Pacing guides, assessments, and student work must align to the standards.

Goal: Through professional learning communities, teachers will have a better understanding of
the content standards, learning intentions, success criteria, and Tier 1 strategies that will
be evident in the work students are asked to do.

Action Step # 1

Teachers will participate in PLC's led by administrators, instructional coaches, and lead
teachers in which the PLC Plus program will be covered to learn about the components of
a healthy PLC.

Action Step # 2

Professional development lead by administrators, lead teachers, instructional coaches, and
outside agencies to focus on learning intentions, success criteria, Tier 1 interventions.

Action Step # 3

Common assessments will be developed, improved, and implemented by teachers,
administrators, and instructional coaches that are aligned to state standards and are at an
appropriate level of rigor.

Action Step # 4

Teachers will participate in professional learning days to develop units, revisit pacing
guides, and improve common assessments.

Action Step # 5

Teachers will use student engagement data to incorporate student voice in their work.

Action Step # 6

Administrators and coaches will visit classrooms and provide feedback in instructional
practices.

Action Step # 7

Allocate opportunities and resources for teachers to analyze and implement instruction
based on student data.

Action Step # 8

Family Engagement Coordinator will hold informational sessions throughout the year for
parents.

Action Step # 9

Parent conferences will be held to inform parents of the academic progress of their
children.

Action Step # 10

Open House will be held to inform students of school wide goals and how to support their
child in their learning.

Action Step # 11

Title I Parent Meeting will be held to inform parents about how student learning is
supported by staff.

Action Step # 12

Parent information sessions hosted by counselors on a variety of topics.


Action Step # 13

Train leaders and teachers in the effective use of electronic testing platforms.

Action Step # 14

Build technology capacity for students and teachers.



Required Questions
1 In developing this plan, briefly describe how the school sought advice from individuals (teachers, staff, other school leaders, paraprofessionals, specialized instructional support personnel, parents, community partners, and other stakeholders) was accomplished.

The School Improvement Plan was written, reviewed and revised by the same
committee who worked on the Comprehensive Needs Assessment. The
principal and assistant principal worked together to make sure that the plan
adequately focuses on specific areas of need within the school. Once the
committee reviewed the document, the plan was sent to all staff members for
feedback. Teachers, paraprofessionals, school leaders, and support staff were
asked to read the plan and provide feedback to the SIP team leader. After
those revisions were made, the School Improvement Plan was posted on the
school website. Parents and community members were provided the
opportunity to make comments and suggestions before the final draft of the
plan was completed.


2 Describe how the school will ensure that low-income and minority children enrolled in the Title I school are not served at disproportionate rates by ineffective, out-of-field, or inexperienced teachers.

All Dalton Public Schools are Title I schools with high levels of minority and
economically disadvantaged students. Principals, with support from human
resources and district directors, seek to recruit, select and retain the best
possible professional educators to provide instruction to students. Human
resources reviews district and CPI data through locally developed reports and
reports provided by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission and the
Georgia Department of Education.


3 Provide a general description of the Title I instructional program being implemented at this Title I School. Specifically define the subject areas to be addressed and the instructional strategies/methodologies to be employed to address the identified needs of the most academically at-risk students in the school. Please include services to be provided for students living in local institutions for neglected or delinquent children (if applicable).

In assessing students' longitudinal data, as well as internal data, it is evident
that the lowest area of performance for the school is in the academic areas of
math as well as a weakness in literacy across the curriculum. Students must
earn four math credits to complete graduation requirements, and literacy
across the curriculum is now included in the Georgia Standards of Excellence.
All students, including those who are identified as at-risk of not completing
high school because of math performance, grades, absences, low
socioeconomic status, received Title I services as part of the school-wide
program. Under this program model, DHS plans to continue to focus on
math and literacy to all students as well as work in all content areas to improve
student achievement on the Georgia Milestones End of Course Assessments
for the FY 19 school year.
Strategies to be used:
1. USA Test Prep software for Georgia Milestone Examinations. This is online
software which allows for individualized remediation and practice for Georgia
Milestones in all content areas.
2. Flexible Learning Time built into the schedule 4 days per week in which
students receive targeted remediation in all academic areas.
3. Co-teaching for special education students and English learner students who qualify for the services.
4. Increase of effective use of technology to support the learner's needs.
5. Differentiation of instruction.
6. Hands-on and applied activities that allow students to make connections
and apply the math skills to real-world scenarios.
7. Counselors, in conjunction with parents, will determine interventions for
struggling students and follow-up on those interventions.
8. Professional development days will be provided for Algebra , Geometry, 9th
Literature and Composition, American Literature and Composition, Biology,
Physical Science, Economics, and US History teachers to collaborate, clarify
standards and , design engaging student work and create common assessments
using appropriate rigor and academic language.
9. Professional Learning Communities will be led by Lead teachers to discuss healthy PLC's and to focus on learning intentions, success criteria, and strategies to support our students in their learning.
10. Instructional coaches in math and social studies to collaborate with teachers during PLC's to design classroom strategies that will support at-risk students.
11. Use Coach books to review content and have practice questions with appropriate rigor.
12. 1:1 devices- All students have a laptop for use in all classes.
13. A Post-Secondary Transition Coach who will provide support, host informational sessions, and assist students in their application process for
college.
14. NewsELA is used in all academic content areas to provided Lexile appropriate reading passages for students as a tool for differentiation.
15. Turnitin.com is used by all ELA teachers to provide feedback to students on all writing assignments to improve grammar and sentence structure and to
improve achievement on ELA portion of the Georgia Milestones Assessment.
16. Noredink.com is used by all ELA teachers to provide support in grammar and mechanics to improve achievement on ELA end of course tests.
17. IXL Math is used by Algebra and Geometry teachers to target areas of weakness in math to improve performance on math common assessments and math EOC's.
18. Math lab is open in the mornings five days a week and staffed with a math teacher to assist students who are struggling with math concepts and to provide reteaching before students retake math assessments.


4 If applicable, provide a description of how teachers, in consultation with parents, administrators, and pupil services personnel, will identify eligible children most in need of services in Title I targeted assistance schools/programs. Please include a description of how the school will develop and implement multiple (a minimum of 2) objective, academic-based performance criteria to rank students for service. Also include a description of the measurable scale (point system) that uses the objective criteria to rank all students.
Not applicable
Dalton High School implements a school-wide Title 1 Plan.

5 If applicable, describe how the school will support, coordinate, and integrate services with early childhood programs at the school level, including strategies for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood education programs to local elementary school programs.
Not applicable


6 If applicable, describe how the school will implement strategies to facilitate effective transitions for students from middle grades to high school and from high school to post-secondary education including:
Coordination with institutions of higher education, employers, and local partners;
and Increased student access to early college, high school, or dual or concurrent enrollment opportunities or career counseling to identify student interest and skills.

Dalton High School implements several strategies to support students in their
transition from middle school to high school.
Dalton High School offers an informational meeting for parents prior to the
start of the school year.

All freshmen undergo freshmen orientation prior to
the first day of school. This day is designed to familiarize students with the
building, work on soft skills necessary for success at the high school level and
provide them with opportunities to network with and ask questions of older
students.
Dalton High School recognizes the importance of supporting our students as
they transition from high school to post-secondary experiences. Therefore, we
employ a Post-Secondary Transition Coach support our students in all steps in
the process of applying to college and earning college acceptance. This person
offers counseling sessions with students about the college application process,
assists students in applying for scholarships, and works to ensure that students
are taking advantage of financial aid opportunities as they embark in avenues
of higher learning.

DHS holds a FAFSA day each year to assist students in completing the documentation necessary to receive HOPE scholarship funds or student financial aid for college. DHS also hosts a Financial Aid
Information Night for students and parents to learn more about the process of applying for financial aid and the types of financial aid that is available.

Each year, Dalton State College admission counselors come to school to accept
students on onsite. Dalton High School students have multiple opportunities
to participate in college visits throughout the school year.

The counseling department schedules visits to many post-secondary institutions in the state of
Georgia. The counselors plan an Apply to College Day for students to complete applications to local colleges.

Dalton High School has members of the Armed Forces come to school to speak to students about the opportunity of military service after graduation. Some juniors take the ASVAB to help provide information about strengths, weaknesses, and skills that may guide students in possible future careers.

All freshmen and seniors take the YouScience, a career assessments, to determine career options based on student strengths, personality, and skill set. Representatives from various colleges
around the state come to visit DHS students throughout the school year to provided information to the students.

All Seniors write a research paper in which they research various careers of interest to help and the colleges which have programs for this chosen career.

A new Financial Literacy course was added this year to help students prepare to be financially responsible when they graduate.

Dalton High School has a successful Work-Based Learning program with a large number of participants. The coordinators build great community relationships so that they can find work opportunities for students.

Over the past few years, there has been an increase in the number of students who
participate in dual enrollment with Dalton State College and Georgia
Northwestern Technical College. For the 2019-2020 school year, DHS has 73
students who are taking college courses either full-time or part-time.

Dual Enrollment Math courses are offered on campus.
Advisement/informational sessions were offered for Juniors and Seniors to
provide information about the high school to college transition.

Futurefest Career Fair s are held yearly for students to visit to learn more about career
opportunities in our community.

POUNCE is an event that is planned to bring our 8th graders over to tour Dalton High School and learn about CTAE, World Languages, Fine Arts and other programs offered.

Dalton High School also offers a variety of Advanced Placement courses in
which students may earn college credit for receiving high scores on the course
exams.

An SAT Preparation course is also offered as an elective to afford students the opportunity to take practice SAT tests, receive feedback, and learn test taking strategies to improve their test results. DHS also has an IB Diploma Programme.


7 Describe how the school will support efforts to reduce the overuse of discipline practices that remove students from the classroom, specifically addressing the effects on all subgroups of students.

Dalton High School administrators will review student referral data from
Infinite Campus to determine trends and patterns in regards to subgroups.
When and if any trends are determined, the administration will work with the
counselors to determine strategies for working with students who do not
follow the guidelines in the student code of conduct.
The administrative team contacts parents of students when it becomes evident
that the students need behavioral support. Parents are asked to come in to
meet with administrators and a Student Performance Agreement is completed
for the students. Behavior issues are addressed in this agreement. Future
consequences are detailed, and strategies are created to help support the
student
The administrative team works with counselors to create behavior intervention
strategies for our students. The counselors work with individual students to
manage their behavior in an effort to keep students in class.